Sole

By Gary M. White, MD

Bulla/Vesicles

Bullous Tinea
Bullous Tinea

Pompholyx
Pompholyx

Weber-Cockayne Variant of Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex
Weber-Cockayne Variant of Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex

Shoe Dermatitis
Shoe Dermatitis

Friction Blister

Hyperhidrosis

Hyperhidrosis

Hyperkeratotic Papule(s)

Plantar Warts, Mosaic
Mosaic Plantar Warts

Callus

Corn
Corn

Carcinoma Cuniculatum

Porokeratosis Palmaris Plantaris Et Disseminata. Multiple circular lesions with a hyperkeratotic rim on the palms, soles, and body are characteristic.

Keratoderma

see Keratodermas

Linear

Cutaneous Larva Migrans
Cutaneous Larva Migrans

Necrosis

Regressing Plantar Wart

Nodule, Solitary

Proteus Syndrome

Plantar Fibromatosis
Plantar Fibromatosis

Eccrine Poroma
Eccrine Poroma

Nodules, Multiple, Red in Children

Recurrent Palmoplantar Hidradenitis In Children.

Mycobacterium Abscessus Infection.

Pseudomonas Infection

Pain

Erythromelalgia

Papulosquamous

Secondary Syphilis
Secondary Syphilis

Keratoderma Blennorrhagicum

Pigmented Lesions

Nevus

Melanoma
Melanoma of the Sole

Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome

Tinea Nigra

Pits

Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome

Pitted Keratolysis

Purpura

Blood Blister
Blood Blister

Pustules

Infantile Acropustulosis

Palmoplantar Pustulosis
Palmoplantar Pustulosis

Red

Acral Erythema Of Chemotherapy

Erythermalgia

Erythromelalgia

Graft vs. Host disease

Gloves And Socks Syndrome

Parechovirus . This virus causes a unique maculopapular rash with solid erythema of the soles [Pediatr Dermatol. 2014 Mar-Apr;31(2):258-9].

Red and Scaly

The two main considerations for one or two red, scaly feet are [tinea pedistinea_pedis.html) and eczema. A KOH is usually the easiest way to distinguish the two. Clues that tinea is the cause include i) coexistent onychomycosis, ii) a moccasin distribution (redness and scale along the entire sole and extending up a cm. on to the sides), and iii) involvement of the web spaces. Clues that eczema is the cause are i) failure to improve on a topical antifungal medication and/or ii) involvement of only the instep.

Rarely, an allergic contact dermatitis to an allergen in shoe wear (shoe dermatitis) may be the cause. In this case, topical antifungals are ineffective and topical steroids help but do not clear. Often, the dorsa of the feet are involved. Patch testing is needed to establish this diagnosis.

Tinea Pedis. This case was unusual in that only the instep was involved, suggesting eczema. But KOH and culture proved it to be fungal.
Tinea Pedis Tinea Pedis

Eczema of the Soles. In comparison, this patient had unilateral eczema.
Eczema of the Soles

Pompholyx

Secondary Syphilis. Courtesy Stephen Goldberg, MD
Secondary Syphilis

Psoriasis. Sometimes, psoriasis can be relatively thin, mimicking eczema.
Psoriasis of the Sole

Shiny, Scaly

Juvenile Plantar Dermatosis
Juvenile Plantar Dermatosis

Pityriasis Rubra Pilaris
Pityriasis Rubra Pilaris

Ulcer

Diabetic Foot Ulcer

Squamous Cell Carcinoma or Basal Cell Carcinoma

Vascular

Pyogenic Granuloma

Kaposi's Sarcoma
Kaposi's Sarcoma

Verrucous

Verrucous Carcinoma
Verrucous Carcinoma

Wart, see above.

RegionalDerm

Homepage | FAQs | Use of Images | Contact Dr. White


It is not the intention of RegionalDerm.com to provide specific medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. RegionalDerm.com only intends to provide users with information regarding various medical conditions for educational purposes and will not provide specific medical advice. Information on RegionalDerm.com is not intended as a substitute for seeking medical treatment and you should always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider for diagnosis and for answers to your individual questions. Information contained on RegionalDerm.com should never cause you to disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking treatment. If you live in the United States and believe you are having a medical emergency call 911 immediately.