ACUTE, RED PLAQUE or PATCH

A variety of entities may present as an acute red patch or plaque. If persistent or unusual, a biopsy is in order. Often, if acute, the lesion fades and the etiology remains unknown.

Bite Reaction
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Cellulitis Note the punch biopsy site medially.
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Erythema Migrans. A type of bite reaction.
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Herald Patch of Pityriasis Rosea. The patient may present at the doctor's office with the herald patch of pityriasis rosea before any of the smaller secondary lesions appear. Some scale is a tip-off.
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Morphea. This red patch or plaque would be most common on the trunk of a middle-aged woman.

Fixed Drug Eruption Tends to be round or oval. May be bullous in center.
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Subacute/Chronic

Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma. This red patch had been present for years on the flank of an elderly man. It is included here not because CTCL presents acutely, but because sometimes the patient is not aware of the true duration of the lesion.
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