ALLERGIC CONTACT DERMATITIS, RHUS

By Gary M. White, MD

Allergic Contact Dermatitis to Rhus or Poison Ivy/Oak A linear, streaky, asymmetric, itchy rash is typical.


Allergic contact dermatitis to poison ivy or oak commonly causes linear, streaky, eczematous, asymmetric rashes. See also Rhus penis.

Clinical

Linear, streaky, eczematous lesions occur, typically in exposed skin, e.g., arms, legs. The penis may be involved if the patient has the Rhus allergen on the hands and transfers it to the genitals. Dramatic swelling may result (see here).

Treatment

A potent topical steroid is in order. If widespread, prednisone may be given. The clothes, shoes, etc., may need to be washed to remove any allergen.

Additional Pictures

Linear streaks with Calamine lotion for the itch.
Allergic Contact Dermatitis to Rhus or Poison Ivy/Oak Allergic Contact Dermatitis to Rhus or Poison Ivy/Oak

Allergic Contact Dermatitis to Rhus or Poison Ivy/Oak Allergic Contact Dermatitis to Rhus or Poison Ivy/Oak

Linear vesicular lesions are typical.
Allergic Contact Dermatitis to Rhus or Poison Ivy/Oak

Courtesy O. Dale Collins, MD
Allergic Contact Dermatitis to Rhus or Poison Ivy/Oak with bulla formation

RegionalDerm

Homepage | FAQs | Use of Images | Contact Dr. White


It is not the intention of RegionalDerm.com to provide specific medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. RegionalDerm.com only intends to provide users with information regarding various medical conditions for educational purposes and will not provide specific medical advice. Information on RegionalDerm.com is not intended as a substitute for seeking medical treatment and you should always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider for diagnosis and for answers to your individual questions. Information contained on RegionalDerm.com should never cause you to disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking treatment. If you live in the United States and believe you are having a medical emergency call 911 immediately.